Striking Writers Reach Tentative Deal With Film And TV Studios To Resolve Strike



Members of the Writers Guild of America and the Screen Actors Guild walk the picket line outside of Universal Studio, in Burbank, California, on August 4, 2023. Tens of thousands of Hollywood actors went on strike at midnight July 13, 2023, effectively bringing the giant movie and television business to a halt as they join writers in the first industry-wide walkout for 63 years. (Photo by VALERIE MACON / AFP) (Photo by VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images)
Members of the Writers Guild of America and the Screen Actors Guild walk the picket line outside of Universal Studio, in Burbank, California, on August 4, 2023. Tens of thousands of Hollywood actors went on strike at midnight July 13, 2023, effectively bringing the giant movie and television business to a halt as they join writers in the first industry-wide walkout for 63 years. (Photo by VALERIE MACON/AFP via Getty Images)

By James Meyers
9:16 AM – Monday, September 25, 2023

The Writers Guild of America (WGA) has reached a tentative deal with film and television studios to end the almost five-month strike. 

On Sunday, union officials emailed WGA members letting them know that a tentative three-year agreement was reached by both sides.

“WGA has reached a tentative agreement with the AMPTP,” the guild said in a statement. “This was made possible by the enduring solidarity of WGA members and extraordinary support of our union siblings who joined us on the picket lines for over 146 days.”

“It is the leverage generated by your strike, in concert with the extraordinary support of our union siblings, that finally brought the companies back to the table to make a deal.”

“We can say, with great pride, that this deal is exceptional — with meaningful gains and protections for writers in every sector of the membership,” the guild negotiating committee said as part of the union’s statement.

The tentative deal comes five days before it would have been the longest in the guild’s history and the longest in Hollywood in over 70 years. 

However, despite the new deal writers were told by their leadership not to return to work until they get the green light. 

The WGA represents almost 11,000 writers in film and TV. The union’s members went on strike asking for better pay, a bigger share of project royalties and protections against the use of artificial intelligence.  

Additionally, Hollywood actors will continue their strike until their union, SAG-AFTRA, reaches a deal with the studios too.